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Talking to Friends and Family

Sometimes it can be tricky talking about FPIES, even with people who are close friends and family!

If you don’t want to say a lot, not everyone needs to know all of the details. There are also times when explaining FPIES to friends, family or teachers can help them to better help you, whether it be at school, home or play!

soccer girl

Who might need to know a bit more about your life with FPIES?

        • Teachers
        • Coaches
        • A friend’s mom
        • Close friends/ family

Different people might need different information about FPIES. Your best friend might want to know different things than your teacher or coach, for example.

Starting the Conversation

Once you decide who you would like to talk to about FPIES, asking to have a private conversation with that person can be helpful

When you start your talk, you might want to have some FPIES information with you, like a copy of an FPIES rack card or awareness card, just in case someone has more questions about FPIES.

**Ask your parent to help you print cards out here or email us and we will send you some in the mail!

The people you love want to know how they can help you in their own special ways, too! 

Letting a friend or family member know when you are having a rough time because of life with FPIES is also important. A parent can help you think of ways that others can help you– sitting down and making a list together can help you to come up with ideas.

Additional Resources:

 

When You Want to to “Be Quick”

Explaining how life with FPIES feels to you can help someone to better understand what it means to walk in your shoes. Sometimes you may not feel ready for a conversation and may just want something quick to say when someone else asks about FPIES. You could try:

If someone asks how you feel about FPIES. . . “FPIES can be hard for kids to deal with but my family helps me to keep myself safe so that I can have fun like any other kid!”

If someone asks what FPIES is. . .  “FPIES is a different type of food allergy– instead of having a reaction right away, it happens a while after I eat a “trigger” food. I am careful to only eat my safe foods so that I stay healthy.”

If someone asks how they can help. . . Share an awareness card with that person and explain the part labeled “SAFE.” Ask a parent for help if you need it!

If someone asks how they can learn more about FPIES. . . Ask that person to check out The FPIES Foundation’s website and offer them an awareness card or rack card.

How have other kids handled this?

Sarah

We want to hear about how you have explained FPIES (and how it affects you!) to friends and family. What has helped you to do this?

Contact us today! We will be posting feedback from you and other kids here on this page!

Emal: contact@thefpiesfoundation.org

Please write “The FPIES Talk” in the subject line

Postal mail:
The FPIES Foundation
Re: The FPIES Talk
PO BOX 304
Stewartville, MN 55976

Page published: Nov.15, 2013. Last update: Aug 4, 2017. Copyright © 2013,The FPIES Foundation

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